2-Week Classes

One credit classes held online January 11, 2021, through January 22, 2021.

AAS 400/WGS 400 Lovecraft Country

BUA 400 The Global Workplace

CLS 100 College Learning Strategies

COM 300 Present Like a Communications Pro

COM 300 Writing to Save Your Life

DES 100 Daily Drawing Exercises

ECS 300 Impact of Technologies on Individuals and the Society

HEA 200 Coping with Crises in College

HEA 300 Health & Happiness

HFS 200 Introduction to Mindfulness and Contemplative Practice

HNR 210 Crocheting for a Cause

HOM 400 Sounding Black: Black British Music & Identity

HST 300 / NSD 400 Food, Culture and Identity in the Mediterranean

ITA 200 Buon Appetito

PHI 200 Happiness and Meaning in Life

PHI 200 Philosophy of Love and Sex

PSC 300 Free Speech Theory & Law

PSC 300 Global Politics of Pandemics

PSC 300 Globalization & the Rise of Populism

PSC 300 Governance & Ethics of Artificial Intelligence

SOC 300 Social Change in Contemporary China

WGS 400 Lovecraft County

AAS 400/WGS 400 Lovecraft Country

Following the commercial success and critical acclaim of horror films like “Get Out” and “Us” with Black protagonists and the sci-fi mini-series “The Watchmen”, HBO presented “Lovecraft Country” in summer 2020. Adapted from a book by Matt Ruff, Lovecraft Country is set in the summer of 1955 in Chicago. Students will explore the series though a Black feminist and intersectional lens as it deftly weaves classic horror tropes and beasts from the HP Lovecraft universe, science fiction elements of Afrofuturism, and supernatural horrors juxtaposed against the real racist horrors of being Black in 1950’s. Students follow and discuss the implications of the adventures of Atticus ‘Tic’ Turner and Leticia Lewis as they confront both horrors by harnessing their power through wit, courage, and magic. Students will be introduced to themes related to Black feminist theory, Black women’s agency Black spirituality, Black and Indigenous sexualities, along critical moments in African American history (Sundown Towns, Green Book, Emmitt Till, “pioneering”, racist terror, medical experimentation, and more. While the main course resource will be the series’ episodes, learning will be supplemented by critical texts and expert guests in Black feminism and Black horror/fantasy.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
AAS 400 U820 Class #: 43305
WGS 400 U820 Class #: 43307
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
AAS 400 U821 Class #: 43306
WGS 400 U821 Class #: 43308

BUA 400 The Global Workplace

This course is designed to guide students’ professional development during a time of rapid change in the world of work. Participation in the course will equip students with the practical skills needed to thrive in digital settings and global contexts, as well as the theoretical background and critical thinking abilities necessary to reflect on their position in these interconnected systems. Through participation in the course, students will be introduced to the global workplace, consider evolving careers in a changing world, identify ethical and practical issues of concern for businesses and workers, and refine their professional objectives and strategies.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
BUA 400 U820 Class #: 43343
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
BUA 400 U821 Class #: 43344

CLS 100 College Learning Strategies

College Learning Strategies is the study and application of strategic approaches to learning including but not limited to reading, note taking, exam preparation, time management, and task management. In this class, strategies are presented and practiced so students may enhance their learning in the context of lectures, readings, recitations, and independent learning situations. This College Learning Strategies course is based on the application of strategies. We will explore strategies in the following ways: (1) what they are, (2) how to use them, (3) when to use them (4) why they are effective and (5) how to adapt them. This course also takes a unique approach toward increasing students’ capabilities for academic success through the practice of stress management and overall wellness with stress and procrastination-busting techniques that can make a big difference in their future endeavors. Students will learn to thrive in their academic pursuits through intentional practice of strategies to assist them in achieving their academic goals.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
CLS 100 U820 Class #: 43341
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
CLS 100 U821 Class #: 43342

COM 300 Present Like a Communications Pro

This course is designed to give students the skills and confidence to make persuasive, even inspirational, presentations in any setting. Topics covered include message construction, the three-step formula for successful communication, verbal and nonverbal communication, including proper stance, eye contact and gestures. Additionally, we will explore the use of presentation tools, e.g., when and how to use a script correctly, ways to establish your authority, the appropriate clothes, how to use a lectern and the proper use of a microphone, etc.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
COM 300 U822 Class #: 43338
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
COM 300 U823 Class #: 43339

COM 300 Writing to Save Your Life

This one-credit course develops your ability to write effectively about your life experiences, covers the history and popularity of the form, and explores some of the most compelling essayists working today. Class time includes writing, reading, and workshopping students’ narratives. We also explore the role this type of writing can play in bolstering a person’s well-being. At the end of the two weeks, each student should have three polished essays (with the goal of earning publication for at least one).

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
COM 300 U820 Class #: 43336
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
COM 300 U821 Class #: 43337

DES 100 Daily Drawing Exercises

This one-credit course will help you maintain and build hand drawing skills. With daily synchronous and asynchronous prompts, feedback via Zoom, and demonstrations you will maintain your drawing skills as well as learning to develop new habits.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
DES 100 U820 Class #: 43347
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
DES 100 U821 Class #: 43348

ECS 300 Impact of Technologies on Individuals and the Society

Proliferation of technologies have impacted our daily life in many ways. These technologies have helped us, in addition to our day-to-day life, to communicate with people from all over the world and helping us to understand other cultures. In general, technologies have increased our social interaction space beyond, in some cases, practically unreachable distance. But if we look carefully we find that the impact of these technologies are good, sometime not so good and even bad on individual and the society. In this course we will discuss technologies and there impacts by reviewing publications with goal of gaining an understanding of how social realities are evolving from these technologies and their impacts on individual and the society.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
ECS 399 U820 Class #: 43461
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
ECS 399 U821 Class #: 43462

HEA 200 Coping with Crises in College

This course will help students understand and respond to crisis situations common to the college experience, with a special focus on Covid.   Students will identify campus and community based (as well as professional and academic) resources and support networks, and develop techniques for responding to and managing crises, both for themselves and in support of others who are facing crises.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
HEA 200 U820 Class #: 43498
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
HEA 200 U821 Class #: 43499

HEA 300 Health & Happiness

This course addresses health and wellness topics. The goal is to promote students’ understanding of their physical, emotional, and social health needs and develop strategies and gather information to improved their overall health and wellbeing. There is a strong mental health focus in this course. It is all about being the healthiest and happiest person possible.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
HEA 300 U820 Class #: 43364
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
HEA 300 U821 Class #: 43365

HFS 200 Introduction to Mindfulness and Contemplative Practice

This course will introduce students to mindfulness and contemplative practice. The material will describe the mechanisms associated with mindfulness (e.g., attention, self-compassion, and emotion regulation), review the science behind mindfulness, and include connections to current challenges facing students during the pandemic (e.g., isolation, loneliness, worry). Students will also have opportunities to explore various mindfulness-based exercises and develop a personal practice for self-care.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
HFS 200 U820 Class #: 43317
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
HFS 200 U821 Class #: 43318

HNR 210 Crocheting for a Cause

A hands-on class that introduces basic crocheting skills and strategies while working to create items to donate to others in community (i.e., newborns and premature babies, people undergoing chemotherapy, refugees/immigrants living in CNY, campus and community food pantries, etc.). Students will learn the history of crocheting, how crocheting has been used to change the world, basic stitches that are the foundation of all crochet projects, the usage of crochet hooks, how to read a pattern, and beginner projects that will strengthen learned skills while producing articles for varied ages.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
HNR 210 U820 Class #: 43309
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
HNR 210 U821 Class #: 43310

HOM 400 Sounding Black: Black British Music & Identity

Sounding Black: British Black Music & Identity will examine British imperial, colonial, political, racial, cultural and social histories and their shaping of contemporary black British music. Britain’s national identity, its political outlook and the impact such constructions have on domestic and international political, racial, gendered and generational views and relations will provide the basis of selected anthropological studies through which the musical response to the colonisation of people from the Caribbean and Africa will be examined. In so doing, Sounding Black: British Black Music & Identity will trace how jazz, reggae, soul, rap and Afrobeat became anglicised and how the escapist, recreational entity that is music was also (and continues to be) weaponised.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
HOM 400 U820 Class #: 43345
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
HOM 400 U821 Class #: 43346

HST 300/NSD 400 Food, Culture and Identity in the Mediterranean

This course will explore how food and dietary practices have shaped various identities in the Mediterranean world, and will challenge the notion of “Mediterranean” as a singular identity and the “Mediterranean diet” as a singular practice.  students will be asked to reflect on how Mediterranean food and culture has been translated into an American context, and how this has shaped their own identity.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
HST 300 U820 Class #: 43453
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
HST 300 U821 Class #: 43454
Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
NSD 400 U820 Class #: 43455
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
NSD 400 U821 Class #: 43456

ITA 200 Buon Appetito

This course provides an introduction to the diverse regions of Italy by way of exploring their culinary traditions. We will study recipes, food histories, and may also partake in cooking demonstrations. One innovative aspect of the course is that we will meet virtually with special guests in Italy and take virtual tours of relevant sites in Italy during lessons. Students will be introduced to vocabulary, common expressions and idioms relating to the topic, but the course is taught in English and requires no prior knowledge of Italian.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
ITA 200 U820 Class #: 43311
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
ITA 200 U821 Class #: 43312

PHI 200 Happiness and Meaning in Life

What does it mean to live a meaningful life? Is a meaningful life a happy life? Can the answers to these questions help us reconcile to all that is wrong with the world? These questions become especially interesting now that we’re going through challenging times where quarantine, anxiety, and limited mobility and sociality are among the defining features of our lives. In this course, we will examine some of the influential philosophical perspectives on the meaning of life and happiness. The course will also aim to improve your critical thinking and writing skills.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
PHI 200 U820 Class #: 43313
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
PHI 200 U821 Class #: 43314

PHI 200 Philosophy of Love and Sex

The first week of the class will focus on different types of love and their metaphysics and ethics. The second week will focus on various questions on ethics of sex such as consent, beauty standards, desires, porn and entitlement.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
PHI 200 U822 Class #: 43315
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
PHI 200 U823 Class #: 43316

PSC 300 Free Speech Theory & Law

Can you falsely shout “FIRE!” in a crowded theater or kneel during the national anthem to protest police brutality?  Is “hate speech” protected by the First Amendment?  Is Twitter allowed to ban it?  Can a city government stop a “Straight Pride Parade” from taking place?  This course will address these questions and more while drawing attention to the legal complexity of free expression disputes.  While focusing on the topics of seditious, obscene, defamatory, and online speech, students will be exposed to common justifications for free and robust speech in society and how the courts have addressed the topic both in the present day and historically.  As such, students will walk away from the class with a firm understanding of the legal doctrine and theory necessary to analyze the range of free speech disputes that emerge on a near-daily basis in today’s society.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
PSC 300 U824 Class #: 43330
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
PSC 300 U825 Class #: 43331

PSC 300 Global Politics of Pandemics

The 2019-2020 coronavirus outbreak has made abundantly clear the complicated politics surrounding pandemic preparedness and response. In this 10-day, 1 credit course, students will explore the organizations (e.g., the World Health Organization [WHO]) and processes (i.e. incidence monitoring and evaluation, vaccine deployment) designed to confront global health crises. Students will learn about – and assess the value of – various theoretical approaches that help us understand the political dynamics of health emergencies, including what drives action/inaction. Finally, we will carefully consider the political, social, and economic causes and implications of pandemic events. By the end of this course, students will have an increased awareness of – and ability to think critically about – the politics of pandemics.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
PSC 300 U820 Class #: 43326
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
PSC 300 U821 Class #: 43327

PSC 300 Globalization & the Rise of Populism

Both globalization and populism are broad and broadly misunderstood terms. Yet their political relevance is evident. In this course, we examine globalization and its effects on politics, especially its contributions to the rise of populism. First, we focus on defining and understanding the concepts of globalization and populism. Next, we turn to the economic effects of globalization, especially who wins and who loses. Finally, we shift our attention to the causes and effects of populism, such as globalization, inequality, and charismatic populist leaders.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
PSC 300 U822 Class #: 43328
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
PSC 300 U823 Class #: 43329

PSC 300 Governance & Ethics of Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is a general-purpose technology that will affect nearly all aspects of society, including criminal justice, health care, employment, and international security. Private and governmental entities are already deploying autonomous systems that affect everyday life, such as facial recognition, hiring decisions, and disease diagnoses. Meanwhile, researchers are quickly making advances in developing algorithms that could outperform humans in tasks that require intelligence, such as playing the strategy game Go. While AI has enormous potential to benefit society, it can also introduce many risks to human safety and well-being. This course uses a cross-disciplinary approach to study how tech companies, national governments, international organizations, and civil society groups could manage the development and deployment of AI in the public interest. The course material draws upon research in political science, public policy, philosophy, legal studies, economics, and computer science. Topics include algorithmic fairness; privacy, transparency, and safety; automation and the future of work; the impact of AI on international security. In recent years, the ethics of AI has become a burgeoning field of study, with various institutions articulating AI ethics principles. But as tech companies and governmental bodies seek to implement policies to manage the technology, how to govern AI has become a deeply political question. While this course touches on the central debates in AI ethics, it emphasizes the political and public policy dimensions of AI governance.

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
PSC 300 U826 Class #: 43332
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
PSC 300 U827 Class #: 43333

SOC 300 Social Change in Contemporary China

This course addresses the drastic social changes in Post-Mao China. A wide range of issues will be discussed, including social stratification and inequalities, internal and outward migration, family transformation, education, urban-rural dynamics, aging, and China’s involvement in globalization. The content of the course will include empirical studies and theoretical perspectives on China’s market/social transition, with a particular interest in comparing it with the transition experiences of other post-socialist countries. Instruction will be implemented through a combination of lectures, student presentations and discussions, and various in-class activities

Available Sections:

Student Type: University College Undergraduate or Graduate Students only
SOC 300 U820 Class #: 43334
Student Type: Main Campus Undergraduate Students
SOC 300 U821 Class #: 43335